I thought I would share the fall color progression that occurs from Campbell Overlook as one looks up at Balsam Point.  Colors cascade down the mountain beginning in late September from the very top and don't reach the bottom until mid November.  The transformation from green to gold is staggering and an incredible sight to behold.
October 9, 2011
October 20, 2011
November 1, 2011
November 13, 2011
 
          Today was to be our last full day in the park until our return for work in March.  We had already thoroughly enjoyed our short visit, but in a way, it seemed as though something was missing.  February is a winter month, yet it hadn't quite felt like winter, at least for me anyways.  All along I was under the impression that it was early spring, determined by the mild temps, sunny skies, and apparent lack of snow.  Sure there were some slicks patches here and there in the higher elevations, and Mt. LeConte had less than a foot on the ground, but without the snow sticking to the trees it was hard to believe that it was actually winter.
          Well, how's this for timing?  That night a system passed through that saw flurries down low and a dusting of snow up high.  So we knew as we headed out that morning that things were in our favor.  Unfortunately, it was still cloudy and one couldn't see above 5,000 feet where most of the snow had fallen on all the mountain peaks.  Our plan was to drive out to Cades Cove and enjoy the sights there, but with it clouded over, there wouldn't be much difference in what we saw when we were last there together in November.  The weather forecast called for some sun to show up in the afternoon, so with hopes of the clouds either lifting or burning off, we decided to hit up Tremont first and do a short hike on the way.
          The drive out to Tremont was enjoyable and traffic was nearly non existent.  The snowplows were just getting started on clearing the roads and Newfound Gap Road across the park was closed because of the freshly fallen snow.  We had plans to drive that way later in the day, so we were hoping the conditions would improve on our return.  Roads were somewhat slick during the approach to Fighting Creek Gap, but after that the roads cleared and the flurries in the air weren't able to stick to the pavement.  During the drive out we continued to admire the clarity of the water that parallels the road.  I also tried to picture what the roadsides would look like in another month or two when the wildflowers awaken from their chilly slumber and bring the park to life.
          The Spruce Flat Falls Trail was one I hadn't done before, but the pictures I had seen gave me the impression that it was one of the better ones in the park.  I was in need for another new mile and this hike was a perfect fit for what we had planned for the day.  One has to park at the GSMIT and walk a bit to the trailhead because of the facilities there and people's privacy.  If you never been there before,  look for "falls trail" signs where the service road terminates or at the beginning of the Lumber Ridge Trail.  When we got out of the vehicle, it was a bit chilly, but once we got moving and our blood flowing, things would surely warm up.
          Right from the start the trail was covered in a thin but slick layer of snow.  The way up has a number of switchbacks at first and requires a few yards worth of big step-ups.  Careful footing was a must around log steps because they were especially slick and you could find yourself on your rear end in a hurry if caught unaware.  There are a number of spur trails that may spark curiosity, but there are signs that point one in the right direction to the falls.  After making our way around a small water tank, the trail cuts up and over the ridge, away from Tremont, and into the woods.  It was such a relief to be in the woods and simultaneously exciting because of all the snow on the ground.  Finally, a winter hike with the feel of winter!  Some sections were a bit daunting like snow covered leaves still sitting on the trail, or the steps carved into a log that would work better as a launching pad for a sled.
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          The trail itself, not marked on the maps issued by National Geographic, basically follows the gravel portion of the road through Tremont.  The path sits higher up the hillside and is separated from the road by the Middle Prong which is easily heard below.  At one point the trail swings around a corner and an opening in the trees offers a view up toward the surrounding ridgeline.  The clouds were still solid across the sky, but they had risen just enough for us to see snow on the trees higher up.  I tried to snap some photos but the cold air seemed to be having its way with my camera lens.  It didn't bother me too much, because the waterfall was what I really wanted.  The trail descends during the last couple tenths into a ravine that houses the falls and takes you right to the base.  If one would rather drive along the gravel road below, the falls is visible from there but obviously much smaller.  The water was pouring over the rocks intensely, similar to what we saw at Ramsey Cascades, so a long shutter interpretation with my camera wasn't going to work all too well.  The rocks around the falls and its pools were wet, but not that slick, and the rhododendron were coated in light snow creating a neat winter scene.  My camera continued to give me fits but I managed to get in a few shots before leaving.
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          That was the bulk of our exercise for the day.  Once we made it back to the vehicle, the weather conditions in our neck of the woods hadn't changed much.  Still cloudy, no sun, and the peaks remained hidden.  Who knows, maybe that would change a bit just during our drive from Tremont to Cades Cove.  It was strange being at the cove this time of year.  No traffic, bicycles, or hayrides.  No families in the picnic area, campground, or store.  I almost felt out of place...but only for a moment.  It was a great feeling to know that I wouldn't have to contend with traffic going around the loop.  Once we made our way deep into the cove and around the open fields, it was evident the clouds were finally beginning to break.  They were slowly but surely lifting above the peaks and bursts of sunlight shot through gaps in the clouds and danced along the slopes.  The highest of the peaks were the whitest while where we were in the cove was mild and dry like early spring.  We parked the car and took the walk out to the John Oliver Cabin.  On the way back, the summit of Pole Knob kept popping in and out of the clouds and the dense snow cover could be seen at its point.  I could only imagine would Thunderhead, or even the higher peaks to the east like Clingmans Dome and Mt. LeConte looked like after that night's snowfall.
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          We didn't stop much between there and the visitor center half way around the loop just because the cloud cover was slow to change and the views one gets to the south were getting repetitive.  After a quick stop at the restrooms and Cable Mill area we were back on the loop.  Now the clouds were really beginning to break, offering up more blue sky, warmer temps, and unobstructed views of the mountains.  Rich Mountain which lies to the north was just about completely clear now and snow along its crest could be seen.  The second half of the drive around the loop is a bit more wooded in places, but that doesn't keep people from stopping to take in the other sights of the cove, that being the wildlife.  Our one jam of the day came in one of these areas where a few deer were hanging out by the road, sifting through leaves and watching cars.  I managed to capture a shot of one deer in its dark winter coat as I waited for the car in front of me to continue on.
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          We were stopping more frequently now because of the various homesteads along the route and their close proximity.  I also felt the need to beef up my historic structures section on this site.  It always seems like everybody and their brother gets the same pictures of these buildings, that's why I enjoy getting out in the backcountry to see the sights and capture images that hardly anybody sees.  Nevertheless, I felt compelled to get several of the arbitrary shots this time around.  One of the neater stops came at the Dan Lawson Place because the sun was really shining at this point and the surrounding ridges topped in snow served as a unique backdrop.
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          We finished out the remainder of the Cades Cove loop having enjoyed our time there, but now we were eager to learn of the conditions of Newfound Gap Road.  Surely if the higher peaks were blanketed in snow, if the skies were clear, and the road was open, we would be in for one heck of an afternoon for sight seeing.  Much of the snow that we saw beside the road on our way out to Cades Cove that morning had already melted off, so that was a positive sign.  Once we made it back to the Sugarlands Visitor Center, we rounded the corner with anxiety.  Sure enough, the cones and signs had been pulled out of the intersection, the gate was open, and traffic was coming from both directions.  My oh my, was the anticipation building.  First up was Campbell Overlook.  We couldn't see above Balsam Point which lies in the center because the clouds seemed to be hung up on Mt. LeConte, but snow could still be seen below the cloud base.  It was about to get better though.  What's great about the drive along Newfound Gap Road is that the views of so many unique landmarks are much more intimate, where in Cades Cove, the vast distance between you and the surrounding peaks makes it feel out of reach.  Cue the drive below Chimney Tops.  It is one of the more interesting landscapes in the park, and for good reason.  In the spring, the heath covered slopes sport whites and pinks.  In autumn, the valley explodes with vibrant colors.  And in the winter, the exposed rocks shine above its steep slopes cloaked in white.  I wouldn't be in any hurry to climb up there at a time like this, but it sure is a beautiful sight to behold.
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          As we made our way past Chimneys, the snow on the ground was getting higher and the amount stuck to the trees was getting thicker.  They had done a fine job of clearing the roads for traffic so there were no worries.  Another bonus was that the clouds sitting between Sugarland Mountain and Mt. LeConte were about all that was left.  The rest of the skies had cleared up for the most part, especially in North Carolina.  Right before we arrived at Newfound Gap, the scenery continued to impress, turning our eyes as big as basketballs.  The white of the conifers against the rich blue of the sky behind has such an incredible contrast.  Everything just kept getting better the higher up we got.  The views from the parking lot at Newfound Gap were as breathtaking as they've ever been, crystal clear and limitless.  The white of snow was pristine and variances of blue in the mountains and sky were vivid.  I had never been able to see that far with such great definition and clarity before from Newfound Gap.  I was blown away to the say the least.
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          We drove a short ways into North Carolina to check out the views from the first few vistas at Luftee Gap and over Deep Creek.  They were equally as impressive.  The fact that it was incredibly cold anytime we stepped out of the vehicle was easily disregarded because of the excitement and satisfaction.  It was difficult to leave such beauty behind, but we were so grateful that our last day in the park for a month gave us that winter fix we were hoping for.  Today was a merely the culmination of a fantastic getaway that once again served as a reminder of why the mountains are home.
 
          Expecting to wake up to rain showers and cloudy skies, much to my dismay, I found blue and sunny skies outside my window.  On this day I had plans of heading across the gap and into North Carolina for the morning.  When I arrived at the visitor center, I was amazed at all the construction work happening.  Year 76 of the Smokies should be themed "under construction" or "extreme makeover" with all of the park's closures and renovations.  Despite being early in the day, it was considerably warm around the Mountain Farm Museum.  The forest was green at these elevations and the dogwoods in the area were in full bloom.  Around the homestead there were apple blossoms, forsythia, and lilacs adding some character to the long wooden fences and barns.  Bees and butterfiles were in their glory around the lilacs.  In my exploring of the farm, I was startled from behind by the call of a rooster.  At least he didn't mind posing for a picture.
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          Up to this point, the number of hikes I've ever done on this side of the park are few...two to be exact.  Andrews Bald and Kephart Prong, otherwise it's strictly been the AT and Tennessee, which has a lot to do with location since I have always stayed in Gatlinburg.  What better place to begin hiking in NC than along the Oconaluftee River Trail, popular for its well graded and easy walking path lined with spring wildflowers and paralleling the river.  Both types of phlox were in peak bloom and in abundance, reminding me of White Oak Sink days before.  Occasionally one would stumble across crested dwarf iris, golden ragwort, may apples, wood betony, wild geraniums, toothwort, and again, a surprising patch of thyme leaved bluets.  Fly fishermen were active up and down the river.
          After reaching Cherokee and turning back to the visitor center, I decided I wouldn't hike any more that day, but rather enjoy the drive back across the park while the skies were so clear and sunny.  Every so often one would pass these stretches of wildflowers that lined roadsides.  As the road went up in elevation, one would move from green woodlands, to budding trees midway, and mostly bare canopies up high.  Views from Webb, Deep Creek, Luftee Gap, and Newfound Gap Overlooks were inspiring as always.  The lighting and changing of the seasons at Campbell Overlook were just right.  Certainly not a bad day to roll the windows down and soak in the views across the park.
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          What better feeling than to leave the clutches of winter in Michigan for the 60+ degree spring teasers of Tennessee.  My first day of many to come here in the Smokies was greeted by sunny skies and friendly new acquaintances.  Soon I will begin work at LeConte Lodge, so I arrived a few days early to get acclimated and psych myself up for being here.  I hadn't hiked since the end of October, so it was time to shake off the dust and get the legs churning again over roots and rocks.  (Oh...and to see if I remembered how to use my camera.)  After arriving at the motel and a quick bite to eat, I was curious to see what work had begun in Cherokee Orchard.  Large trucks were cycling up and down the roadway and tourists couldn't drive past the Ogle Place.  I took some of the typical shots of the old buildings and decided to take a stroll on the Junglebrook loop trail.  I thought I might see a wildflower peaking out of the forest floor, but none were to be seen this day.  I ran into three tame deer searching for food and that was about it for the action.  If you make it to the upper reaches of the trail that parallel the road, you'll see that all of the pavement has been torn up.  It'll be nice to return here in April when the Dogwoods have opened up with their numerous white blooms.
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Road construction along Cherokee Orchard
          With the threat of rain in the forecast, I wanted to get up to Newfound Gap to see the snow and ice I'd been hearing about for weeks, and maybe take in some views in case the ridges get clouded over.  Along the upper reaches of the highway, several impressive columns of ice had formed.  Places where the ice turns blue are particularly attractive.  Makes me wonder what I'll run into at spots like Alum Cave Bluffs, renowned for its car sized ice chunks that rocket downward toward unsuspecting hikers, should cool temps keep the ice hanging around.
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Looks like a Church Organ made of Ice
          Good to be back in the mountains.  Put more miles on in the wheels than the boots today, but ya gotta start somewhere.  If you would like to see the rest of the day's photos from the Ogle Place and Newfound Gap Road, just click on the two links.  Until next time!
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